The Tale of Two Ears

You can tell a lot about a cat based on the position of their ears alone. For example, if their ears are forward they are likely feeling content, if they are in the airplane position (or sideways) they may be feeling a bit anxious and need space and if the ears are flat against their head it is a sure sign they are feeling defensive and may become aggressive. Understanding a cat’s ears – and just their general body language (check out our resource to learn more about cat body language) is especially important with interacting with certain felines like our good friend Bonnie.

Bonnie is a 12-year-old, spayed brown and white tabby. She’s a bit round, enjoys lounging in sunny windows and is just generally adorable. Bonnie LOVES to play and feather toys, like the Da Bird, are her favorite. She is an independent lady, and while she loves people she’d really prefer to interact with them on her terms. Visiting with Bonnie typically goes one of two ways, she either wants your affection or she doesn’t.  She certainly does not want to be picked up (she is a lady after all), and we think she’d do best in a home with children over the age of 12.

Bonnie can sometimes become overstimulated with too much attention. Meaning that she may react in an aggressive manner when she no longer wishes to be interacted with – see notes about reading her ears and other body language from above. Understanding how to read Bonnie’s body language and respecting her boundaries are very important to her. And, as we mentioned Bonnie loves a good play-sesh. Play therapy will make a big difference to this rotund feline. Not only might she shed a few pounds, the mental and physical stimulation might help her keep her overstimulation behaviors in check. Plus, it’s fun. There’s nothing quite as adorable as watching your cat chase the feather toy followed by that moment of complete triumph when they capture their “prey”.

We’d also like to mention that Bonnie has been at the shelter since April, and we’d really like to see her stretch those tabby toes in her new home. Bonnie has lived well with dogs in the past but would prefer to be the queen of her castle in a single kitty home. She came to us declawed and does have a heart murmur that may require additional veterinary care in the future – we’ll give you more information when you come to visit.

Come meet Bonnie. Don’t let her past speak for her future. Sometimes all it takes is finding the right match to lock-in that forever home, and if you want a cat with a little spunk she just might be the lady for you!

To learn more about Bonnie or other pets available for adoption visit ddfl.org or call 303.751.5772. All adoptions include spay or neuter surgeries, age-appropriate vaccinations, a microchip ID and a free veterinary visit with a participating veterinarian.